“Wanted – Dead or Alive”

Your phones ‘Wanted – Dead or Alive’! Recycle your mobile phone with mobilecashmate, if they are working or non-working. Check how much your phone is worth, as we beat most recyclers.

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New Year, New Phone!

Christmas has been and gone, and for many of you this won’t have meant coal waiting for you at the end of your bed or under the tree, but a shiny new mobile phone! So why keep hold of your old one, when you can recycle it and get yourself some extra money!

It’s as simple as looking up the model of your phone, sending it to us FREE and then getting paid, it’s like a second Christmas! Also, it’s not only mobile phones that we buy; we also buy tablets and iPad’s, so if you have recently upgraded or received an unwanted gift then send it to us and get some money for it!

Every year mobile phones and other electronic devices are thrown away and left to decay in a hole in the ground, instead of doing this, you could send your unwanted phones to us and we will give you money for them! You are not only helping the environment and preserving the planet’s life by doing this, but you are earning yourself some money! What more could you ask for?!

Don’t delay or throw away your old phone, get it sent to us as soon as possible!

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Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini vs Samsung Galaxy S3

The Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini claims to pack the goodies of the Samsung Galaxy S3 flagship into a smaller body. But does it? We’ve taken a look at the specs of both phones to see if the family resemblance is more than skin deep. 

Price and Release Date

Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini - £250, November release
Samsung Galaxy S3 - £400-500 SIM-free, released May 2012

The Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini will arrive on shelves around six months after its bigger brother. Samsung’s S3 landed in May 2012, and the Galaxy S3 Mini will go on sale in November.

Pre-orders for the smaller take on the Samsung phone flagship have begun, with the phone set to sell for around £250 on a pre-pay deal. That’s around half the price of the Samsung Galaxy S3, although the cost of the larger phone is starting to creep down too.

Design

Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini - 9.9mm thick, 63mm wide, 112g, plastic body
Samsung Galaxy S3 – 8.6mm thick, 71mm wide, 133g, plastic body

The Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini looks every bit the baby brother of the full-size Galaxy S3. Its body uses the same style of plastic outer, with a familiar removable battery cover on the rear.

Its bezel-to-screen ratio is a little worse and the body is a little thicker than the original S3, but this is to be expected of a smaller framed, more affordable device. It’s just a bit of puppy fat, if you will. Several of its dimensions are eerily similar to the first Galaxy S phone, released all the way back in 2010. It’s 9.9mm thick, 119g and 63mm wide.

It won’t feel quite as slick in-hand as the big daddy 4.8in Galaxy S3, but if you find that phone a little too much for your hand to take, you’ll probably find the Mini edition much easier to live with.

Screen

Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini - 4in Super AMOLED, 480 x 800 pixels
Samsung Galaxy S3 – 4.8in Super AMOLED, 720 x 1,280 pixels

If there’s one element of the Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini that points it out as a compromised device, it’s the screen.

Elements of it are more-than fine. Its Super AMOLED panel is great and the 4in size offers a good compromise between size and performance. It’s the resolution that’s the problem.

480 x 800 pixels feels out of date in this age of HD-resolution phones. Again, we’re reminded of the 2010 Samsung Galaxy S, which had a display of identical baseline specs. In the flesh it’ll look decent, but it’s not going to impress the techies.

The Samsung Galaxy S3 offers a much better display. At 4.8in, it’ll be a little too large for some people, but its 720p resolution offers a superbly sharp image.

Both screens use Super AMOLED tech, which offers fantastic black levels and excellent contrast, although colours tend to look oversaturated. Samsung gives you some control over colour settings in its latest phones, though.

Power


Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini -
Dual-core 1GHz NovaThor U8420, 1GB RAM
Samsung Galaxy S3
– Quad-core 1.4GHz Exynos 4412, 1GB RAM

Other than the disappointing screen tech, the second-place part that shows the Galaxy S3 Mini up as a mid-range phone at best is the processor. Not only is it from a completely different processor family from the Galaxy S3’s Exynos model, it’s dual-core rather than quad-core.

This should give the Mini enough power to make Android Jelly Bean run perfectly smoothly 99 percent of the time, but it will mean that the small Galaxy S3 phone won’t produce anywhere near as impressive benchmark results. And it may not be able to keep up with some future 3D games. Each chipset uses a Mali-400 based graphics processing unit, but the Mali-400MP of the Galaxy S3 is optimised for quad-core processors and produces better results.

Both the number of cores and the clock speed is higher in the 6-month-old Galaxy S3. It uses a 1.4GHz quad-core chip while the S3 Mini has a 1GHz dual-core CPU.

Software

Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini - Android 4.1 Jelly Bean w/TouchWiz
Samsung Galaxy S3 - Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich w/TouchWiz (4.1 update on the way)

The one part that the Galaxy S3 Mini arrives out front (for the time being) is software. It uses the latest Android version, Jelly Bean, with the Samsung TouchWiz UI smeared on top.

In most parts of the world, the Samsung Galaxy S3 still uses the previous edition, Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich. Unless you live in Poland, you’ll still have to wait for the update to fly its way over to your neck of the woods. We did think that data could travel across the globe at near-light speeds, but perhaps Android updates are distributed by carrier pigeon these days…

Connectivity

Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini - microUSB, NFC,  
Samsung Galaxy S3 – microUSB, “MHL”, NFC

Samsung deserves a high-five for some of its hardware approaches taken in both the Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini and Galaxy S3. Both phones use the up-and-coming NFC wireless communications standard, have all the usual Wi-Fi/Bluetooth/GPS gubbins and feature the industry standard microUSB slot for charging and data transfer.

This microUSB port is MHL-compliant too, letting you output HD video and surround audio when using the right kind of cable. The one downer is that Samsung has made this port ever-so-slightly proprietary and it’ll reportedly only work properly as a video output when used with Samsung’s own cable. This costs around £20.

Storage


Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini
– 8/16GB with microSD slot
Samsung Galaxy S3 – 16/32/64GB with microSD slot

As a lower-cost device, we’re not too surprised to see that the Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini doesn’t offer particularly high-capacity options. You’re stuck with either 8GB or 16GB of internal memory, while the full fat Samsung Galaxy S3 goes all the way up to 64GB (although good luck finding the 64GB model in the UK…).

Initial storage isn’t a huge concern, though, as both phones come with a microSD memory card slot that lives under the battery cover.

Camera

Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini – 5MP, LED flash, VGA secondary camera
Samsung Galaxy S3 - 8MP, LED flash, 1.9MP secondary camera

Once again, the Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini feels the cuts involved in stepping down from the level of a flagship phone to a mid-range one. It offers a 5-megapixel camera sensor while the Galaxy S3 has an 8MP camera. The secondary cameras show a similar gap, with a VGA user-facing sensor against the superior 1.9MP sensor of the previous S3 model.

Samsung tends to produce rather good phone cameras, but we do not doubt that the S3 Mini will be thoroughly outpaced by its big brother. As if to demonstrate this, the Mini edition is only capable of capturing video up to 720p in resolution, while the earlier S3 can snag 1080p video.

Battery

Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini – 1500mAh
Samsung Galaxy S3 – 2100mAh

Once again, the Samsung Galaxy S3 reminds of the original Samsung Galaxy S, this time in its battery capacity. Like the great grandfather of the series, the new Mini features a 1500mAh unit. That’s a good deal smaller than the Samsung Galaxy S3’s 2100mAh battery.

Of course, one of the biggest drains on a phone’s battery is the screen, and the smaller, lower resolution of the Mini’s 4-incher should ensure somewhat-comparable battery stamina. You’re looking at around a day and a half’s moderate use from a charge.

Verdict

Samsung seemed to claim that the Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini was like a Galaxy S3 crammed into a smaller body. But that’s not really true. It’s much more like a revisited Samsung Galaxy S, a phone that’s more than two years old.

This isn’t a terrible thing, but means that the Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini is a perfunctory mid-range phone rather than something particularly exciting and new. 

The Samsung Galaxy S3 offers a much better display. At 4.8in, it’ll be a little too large for some people, but its 720p resolution offers a superbly sharp image.

Both screens use Super AMOLED tech, which offers fantastic black levels and excellent contrast, although colours tend to look oversaturated. Samsung gives you some control over colour settings in its latest phones, though.

Power


Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini -
Dual-core 1GHz NovaThor U8420, 1GB RAM
Samsung Galaxy S3
– Quad-core 1.4GHz Exynos 4412, 1GB RAM

Other than the disappointing screen tech, the second-place part that shows the Galaxy S3 Mini up as a mid-range phone at best is the processor. Not only is it from a completely different processor family from the Galaxy S3’s Exynos model, it’s dual-core rather than quad-core.

This should give the Mini enough power to make Android Jelly Bean run perfectly smoothly 99 percent of the time, but it will mean that the small Galaxy S3 phone won’t produce anywhere near as impressive benchmark results. And it may not be able to keep up with some future 3D games. Each chipset uses a Mali-400 based graphics processing unit, but the Mali-400MP of the Galaxy S3 is optimised for quad-core processors and produces better results.

Both the number of cores and the clock speed is higher in the 6-month-old Galaxy S3. It uses a 1.4GHz quad-core chip while the S3 Mini has a 1GHz dual-core CPU.

Software

Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini - Android 4.1 Jelly Bean w/TouchWiz
Samsung Galaxy S3 - Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich w/TouchWiz (4.1 update on the way)

The one part that the Galaxy S3 Mini arrives out front (for the time being) is software. It uses the latest Android version, Jelly Bean, with the Samsung TouchWiz UI smeared on top.

In most parts of the world, the Samsung Galaxy S3 still uses the previous edition, Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich. Unless you live in Poland, you’ll still have to wait for the update to fly its way over to your neck of the woods. We did think that data could travel across the globe at near-light speeds, but perhaps Android updates are distributed by carrier pigeon these days…

Connectivity

Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini - microUSB, NFC,  
Samsung Galaxy S3 – microUSB, “MHL”, NFC

Samsung deserves a high-five for some of its hardware approaches taken in both the Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini and Galaxy S3. Both phones use the up-and-coming NFC wireless communications standard, have all the usual Wi-Fi/Bluetooth/GPS gubbins and feature the industry standard microUSB slot for charging and data transfer.

This microUSB port is MHL-compliant too, letting you output HD video and surround audio when using the right kind of cable. The one downer is that Samsung has made this port ever-so-slightly proprietary and it’ll reportedly only work properly as a video output when used with Samsung’s own cable.

Storage


Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini
– 8/16GB with microSD slot
Samsung Galaxy S3 – 16/32/64GB with microSD slot

As a lower-cost device, we’re not too surprised to see that the Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini doesn’t offer particularly high-capacity options. You’re stuck with either 8GB or 16GB of internal memory, while the full fat Samsung Galaxy S3 goes all the way up to 64GB (although good luck finding the 64GB model in the UK…).

Initial storage isn’t a huge concern, though, as both phones come with a microSD memory card slot that lives under the battery cover.

Camera

Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini – 5MP, LED flash, VGA secondary camera
Samsung Galaxy S3 - 8MP, LED flash, 1.9MP secondary camera

Once again, the Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini feels the cuts involved in stepping down from the level of a flagship phone to a mid-range one. It offers a 5-megapixel camera sensor while the Galaxy S3 has an 8MP camera. The secondary cameras show a similar gap, with a VGA user-facing sensor against the superior 1.9MP sensor of the previous S3 model.

Samsung tends to produce rather good phone cameras, but we do not doubt that the S3 Mini will be thoroughly outpaced by its big brother. As if to demonstrate this, the Mini edition is only capable of capturing video up to 720p in resolution, while the earlier S3 can snag 1080p video.

Battery

Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini – 1500mAh
Samsung Galaxy S3 – 2100mAh

Once again, the Samsung Galaxy S3 reminds of the original Samsung Galaxy S, this time in its battery capacity. Like the great grandfather of the series, the new Mini features a 1500mAh unit. That’s a good deal smaller than the Samsung Galaxy S3’s 2100mAh battery.

Of course, one of the biggest drains on a phone’s battery is the screen, and the smaller, lower resolution of the Mini’s 4-incher should ensure somewhat-comparable battery stamina. You’re looking at around a day and a half’s moderate use from a charge.

Verdict

Samsung seemed to claim that the Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini was like a Galaxy S3 crammed into a smaller body. But that’s not really true. It’s much more like a revisited Samsung Galaxy S, a phone that’s more than two years old.

This isn’t a terrible thing, but means that the Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini is a perfunctory mid-range phone rather than something particularly exciting and new.

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Apple iPad Mini Review

The iPad Mini launch comes as no great shock, but as the reviews roll in, what remains surprising is how Apple has reacted to the 7-inch tablet hype. The charge towards smaller tablet form factors, led by the Google Nexus 7 and Kindle Fire HD, has finally been endorsed by Apple.

After watching Tim Cook address an intimate gathering of tech folk from around the world here in San Jose, we’ve just spent a bit of time playing with the iPad Mini. Here are our initial thoughts pending a full iPad Mini review as soon as possible.

iPad Mini: Build

Lighter and thinner than we’d thought when watching the Keynote, the iPad Mini fits comfortably in one hand, with the reduced-size side bezels giving seemingly more screen.

Jony Ive said that Apple had built the iPad Mini from the ground up, rather than just shrinking the bigger iPad 3. It shows. The rounded edges are reminiscent of the widely loved iPhone 3G and it feels durable enough to sling in a bag.

It’s 7.2mm thin (23% thinner than the big iPad) and 308g (Wi-Fi-only model) light. The volume and screen-rotation lock buttons have moved to the right-hand side and the headphone socket is placed on the top, rather than the bottom, where stereo speakers and the new Lightning connector can be found. Reading a book works well – especially with the updated iBooks continuous streaming feature – because of the reduced weight and size. It’s a definite competitor to the Kindle in this regard.

iPad Mini: Screen

The LED-backlit screen looks fantastic on the 7.9-inch display. Colours are vivid, text is pin sharp, web pages render quickly and, because there’s almost a 4:3 ratio going on, you get a lot of content on page. It feels squarer than the bigger iPad, but definitely works as, arguably, a better mobile experience than its bigger brother.

Screen resolution is 1024×768 resolution at 163ppi – same as the iPad 2 – so apps all work without any letter-boxing. Videos and photos look great and you can fit 25 app icons on every page (including the shortcut bar)

iPad Mini: Camera

The back-facing 5MP iSight camera is similar to what we’ve seen on bigger iPads. Taking pictures or video is easier with one hand, purely because of the Mini’s size. In the wild, it’s much more manageable than the iPad. Still shots that we took were ok, but 1080p video is more impressive. With stabilisation kicking in, plus integration with iOS 6, getting video content online will be easy.

iPad Mini: Performance

Hard to tell in the 15 mins that we had with the iPad Mini, but the A5 processor powered apps, games and websites along very smoothly. It’s loaded with LTE, which means you’ll be able to use it on EE’s 4G network in the UK. 5GHz WiFi means super fast browsing with compatible routers, too. Our experience was impressive and we can’t wait to give it a proper run in the coming weeks.

iPad Mini: Battery

Apple claims 10-hours and we hope it’s close. The third-gen iPad suffered because of the sheer amount of processing power happening and, for the iPad Mini to succeed as a mobile device, battery life will need to be close to what Apple is claiming

iPad Mini: Verdict

We’d go as far as saying that the iPad Mini is our favourite iPad yet. The smaller size, thinner shape and lighter weight makes for a much better mobile experience. It’s easy to hold and manipulate in the hand but feels durable and well-built enough to accompany you throughout the day. It’s definitely more premium that we were expecting.

The main sticking point, however, is price and at £269 for the entry level Wi-Fi model. The iPad Mini will undoubtedly sell like hot cakes and will be at the top of many people’s Christmas wish list, but the price still gives Android tabs a place in the market.

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iPhone 5 Vs iPhone 4S

The Apple iPhone 5 is here, and it’s arguably the biggest change in the series since the iPhone 4 hit the scene back in 2010. A new design, a larger screen and a much faster processor all feature. But how does it really stack up against the previous iPhone 4S? Is it really worth the upgrade? We take a closer look at each aspect of the phone to find out.

Design
iPhone 5 – 7.6mm thick, metal casing, non-removable battery
iPhone 4S – 9.3mm thick, glass front and back, metal slides, non-removable battery

The iPhone 5 takes the phone range in a slightly different direction, in terms of looks. It’s not any wider than the 4S, but it is longer, letting Apple pack in a larger screen without dramatically changing the ergonomics of the device. Apple’s new approach also lets the iPhone 5 get a little thinner – 7.6mm instead of 9.3mm.

A slimmer design might make you assume the phone will be harsher and more severe-feeling in-hand, but the opposite is true. The phone now has bevelled edges rather than the sharp-ish sides of the iPhone 4S.  The previous glass rear of the phone has gone too, replaced by a special metal back – it’s nowhere near as shatter-prone as the 4S.

The particular metal alloy used for the back of the phone apparently makes it feel just like glass too, so the iPhone 5 should pretty-much retain a similar tactile feel to the iPhone 4S.

Screen
iPhone 5 – 4in, 640 x 1136 (widescreen), IPS
iPhone 4S – 3.5in, 640 x 960, IPS

The iPhone screen is finally getting a bit bigger. It has been 3.5in ever since the first iPhone was released in 2007, but the big A has finally relented and got on board with the big-screen trend – a little, at least.

Apple’s fifth iPhone uses a 4in screen, of 640 x 1,136 pixels. Pixel density and screen width are identical to the iPhone 4S’s, but the aspect has changed – the iPhone 5 is much more widescreen than the older iPhones. This will come in handy for movie-watching, and should also help out a bit with games, as there’s a wider expanse of screen that won’t be blocked by your fingers.

The core display technology hasn’t changed hugely, at least not from the end user’s point of view. Both the iPhone 5 and 4S use IPS-variant screens, which offer great viewing angles and good colour reproduction. The iPhone 4S screen was great and – guess what – the iPhone 5 screen is great too.

There area technical breakthroughs in the screen, but most aren’t all that visible to the naked eye. Most notably, the screen architecture is more advanced, letting it become skinnier, helping to shave those extra fractions of a millimetre off the body.

Power
iPhone 5 – “twice as fast” processor 1GB RAM
iPhone 4S – dual-core 1GHz Apple A5,

As yet, all that Apple has said about the processor of the iPhone is that it is twice as fast as that of the iPhone 4S, which has a dual-core 1GHz processor and a pretty nifty PowerVR GPU. Does that mean the iPhone 5’s chip is quad-core? Not necessarily – we’ll have to wait for further info to be revealed to find out.

However, it does prove that the iPhone 5 brings a significant processor update. This is no measly iterative upgrade. Come back in a bit – we’ll update this feature as soon as we know the full details.

Connectivity

iPhone 5 – mini 19-pin proprietary port, nano-SIM, no microSD, 4G option
iPhone 4S – 30-pin port, microSIM, no microSD

One of the most earth-shaking changes in the iPhone 5 is one that many people won’t be too excited about, and some may even dislike. Apple has switched from the great big 30-pin connector, which has been in use for aeons, to a much smaller 8-pin type. This is roughly the size of a microUSB port, although this is proprietary all the way. Yes, it’s a pain, but did you really expect anything else?

It’s a much slicker design, but it’ll have industry-wide knock-on effects. All those charge docks and audio docks will no longer work, although Apple will offer a converter that will sit between the old 30-pin socket docks and the new iPhone 5’s port.

The SIM gone on a diet too. Last year, we thought the microSIM of the iPhone 4S was small, but the teeny iPhone 5 nano-SIM makes it look positively gigantic. The nano-SIM is 12.3mm by 8.8mm and is exceedingly slim. There’s no easy DIY method for turning a microSIM into a nano-SIM as far as we know, so if you’re making the jump to an iPhone 5, you’ll need to get hold of a new SIM card.

Both these phones will come in 4G flavours in the UK, courtesy of EE. However, you can bet that each will cost you a fair bit more than a 3G version on a contract.

Storage

iPhone 5 – 16/32/64GB, non-expandable
iPhone 4S – 16/32/64GB, non-expandable

The storage ceiling of the iPhone 5 has not moved above the 64GB offered by the top model iPhone 4S. It’s likely down to the price of flash memory not having dropped to a sufficiently low price to make a 128GB iPhone 5 cost less than… the moon. We’re left with the usual roster of 16GB, 32GB and 64GB models.

Just above, we’ve quoted the original figures for the iPhone 4S’s storage options, but during the iPhone 5 launch, Apple also announced a new “budget” iPhone 4 with 8GB or memory.

As usual, you can’t expand upon the memory with an iPhone 5. It’s just not how Apple rolls.

Camera
iPhone 5 – 8MP, LED flash
iPhone 4S – 8MP, LED flash

One part of the phone that hasn’t been given a massive upgrade is the camera. Both phones use 8-megapixel sensors and single-LED flashes. However, Apple has redesigned the lens – it’s now a Sapphire lens, which should result in better image quality than the iPhone 4S can provide.

Verdict

The iPhone 5 is undoubtedly the biggest update the series has had since the iPhone 4 turned up with its non-curvy design back in 2010. Its larger screen alone is enough to justify its existence. But is it a must-have upgrade? If you’re not the type that needs to have every gadget as it’s released, there’s no great rush. The best bits of the iPhone 5 will only show themselves once devs have gotten a hold on that extra screen space.

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Should you get the new iPhone 5? MoneySupermarket.com

So there you have it, Apple has finally unveiled its newest smartphone – the iPhone 5. With a range of new bells and whistles it’s bound to impress faithful fans, but is it really all it’s cracked up to be?

As it’s only on sale from September 21, you’ve got a bit of time to decide whether or not to upgrade, so here’s a look at the key features of the new handset to help you weigh it up.

In a glitzy launch event at San Francisco’s Yerba Buena Centre on September 12, Apple detailed the iPhone 5’s key features, much of which had already been seen in pictures and videos leaked on the web ahead of the event.

The most obvious upgrade is to the handset’s design and screen dimensions. Gone is the 3.5 inch (diagonal) screen used in every iPhone to date, in favour of a new 4 inch screen.  The new dimensions allow for five rows of apps compared to its predecessors’ four rows.

That new screen has a resolution of 1,136×640 pixels, which means it’s still a Retina Display – Apple’s moniker for its highest resolution displays. It also means the aspect ratio of the device has changed to 16:9. It’s expected app developers will now optimise for the new dimensions.

Gone is the rear glass casing of the iPhone 4 and 4S in favour of a new brushed aluminium backplate, and the handset is 18% thinner than its predecessor.

Under the hood is the brand new A6 processor, which Apple says is twice as fast as the A5 found in the iPhone 4 and 4S. This means it’ll be capable of more impressive graphics, sound and multi-tasking. The battery has also been improved, promising 225 hours’ standby time.

The rear camera has been given a radical overhaul and is now in line with many other smartphones on the market at 8 megapixels. New software also allows pictures to be stitched together to created panoramic shots. The front-facing camera has also been given a higher resolution sensor.

One change which is sure to irk some people is the new smaller dock connector used to charge the phone or connect it to your computer or accessories. The new 80% smaller port means that your current iPhone accessories won’t work with the iPhone 5, at least not without an adapter.

Finally, the new iOS6 software brings a completely overhauled maps app, Siri improvements and more.

 

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Apple Prepares To Reveal iPhone 5

The stage is set for Apple to unveil a new-generation iPhone as the culture-changing company once again lays claim to the heart of the internet age lifestyle. The star of the Apple event in the Yerba Buena Theatre in San Francisco overnight is expected to be an iPhone 5 with a big, beautiful touchscreen, connectivity to blazingly fast telecom networks, and improved battery life.

Apple has been tight-lipped about what is in store at its media event, but hinted at a keenly anticipated new iPhone model in invitations that bore the cryptic message “It’s almost here” and say that it will be available in the US by the end of the month.

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10 Ways to Reduce Global Warming

Practical ways to Reduce Global Warming

Reduce Global Warming

Burning fossil fuels increases the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, and carbon dioxide is a major contributor to the greenhouse effect and global warming.

You can help to reduce the demand for fossil fuels, which in turn reduces global warming by using energy more wisely. Here are 10 simple actions you can take to help reduce global warming.

1.  Reuse, Reduce,Recycle

Reduce waste by buying reusable products as opposed to disposables. You can also buy products with less packaging so that you throw less away. Whenever you can, recycle paper, plastic, glass and metal (aluminium). If there is no recycling program at your workplace, school or in your community, get one started! By recycling half of your household waste, you can save up tons of CO2 every year from being released into the atmosphere.


2. Use less energy around the house- Heating/Air-Con

By adding insulation into your walls and loft, you can lower your heating costs by more than a quarter as it reduces the amount of energy you need to heat and cool your home. If you also turn down your heating at night or while you’re away from the house you can save money.  Turning down your thermostat by just 2 degrees could save about 2,000 of CO2 yearly.

3. Save the World by Changing a Light Bulb

Try replacing your standard light bulbs with compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs. By replacing just one 60-watt incandescent light bulb with a CFL you can save over £15 over the life of the bulb. You may be thinking that this does not seem like a lot, but CFLs last 10 times longer, use two-thirds less energy and emit 70% less heat. So as well as saving money on incandescent bulbs, you also save money on your electricity bills.

If every UK family were to use CFLs, 30 billion tons of greenhouse gasses would be eliminated which is equal to taking 7.5 million cars off of our roads.

4. Ditch the Car!

Not only does driving less reduce emissions in the atmosphere but you also save on petrol and walking and biking are great forms of exercising. Also look at public transport and car-sharing to work or school. When you do have to drive, however, make sure that you are using your car effectively. Check your tires are properly inflated – having properly inflated tires can improve your mileage by more than 3%. Every litre of petrol you save not only helps you save money but it also helps reduce carbon emissions.

5. Buying Energy-Efficient Products

When you come to buy a new car, choose one that offers good mileage. Kitchen appliances now also come in a range of energy efficient models. CFLs are designed to provide more natural looking light while using far less energy as that of an incandescent light bulb. Try to avoid products that have excess packaging, especially moulded plastic and other packaging that is not recyclable. If you reduce your household waste by 10% you can save up to half a ton of CO2 going into the atmosphere.

6. Use Less Hot Water

Set your water heater to about 50 degrees to save energy and wrap it in an insulating blanket if it is over 5 years old. Using low flow shower heads saves water, and reduces your Co2 footprint. When thinking of washing your clothes, doing so in warm or cold water can reduce your use of hot water and also reduce the amount of energy that is needed to produce it. Your clothes still get clean, after all.

7. Make a routine of turning Everything off

Turning off lights when you leave a room is a pretty common thing that we can all do to cut down our environmental impact. Also, it is a good idea to turn off your TV, DVD player, stereo and computer when you aren’t using them. It is also wise to turn off the water when you aren’t using it while brushing your teeth, shampooing your hair or washing your car. Turning off the water until you need it for rinsing is very important as by doing this you will greatly reduce your water bill and help conserve a vital resource.

8. Plant a Tree

If you are able to plant a tree, start digging! Via photosynthesis, trees and other plants absorb CO2 and give off Oxygen. They are a significant part of the natural atmospheric exchange cycle on Earth. There are too few plants and trees to fully counter the increase in CO2. Think it won’t make a difference? Think again. Just one tree can absorb one ton of CO2 in its lifetime. What are you waiting for?

9. Get a Home Energy Audit done.

Utility companies often provide free home energy audits to help their customers to identify areas in their homes that may not be energy efficient. In addition, many utility companies sometimes offer rebate programs to help pay for the cost of energy-efficient upgrades. You might also like to look into Solar power as a means of producing your own energy.


10. Encourage Others to Recycle/Get involved

When researching or learning about how to reduce your environmental impact, share the information a with your friends, neighbours and co-workers. Why not take opportunity to encourage people in power to create programs and policies that are beneficial for the environment. It might only take one email.

Other things you can do are to encourage others to recycle old mobiles, as these, along with other electronic goods damage the environment greatly when left in landfill sites.

These 10 steps will take you a long way toward reducing your energy use and your monthly budget. And less energy use means less dependence on the fossil fuels that create greenhouse gasses and contribute to global warming.

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New Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 to be released this month

Samsung´s new tablet was announced at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona in February, and will have  a screen that is almost double the size of its predecessor.


Samsung will launch the new Galaxy Note 10.1 device sometime in August as an extension to the Galaxy Note range.

The new tablet runs Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich and it has a 1.4GHz processor . It also boasts a five megapixel primary camera, a 1.9 megapixel camera on the front, HD video facilities, as well as the options for 16, 32 or 64GB of internal memory.

It features S Note, which enables users to combine notes or sketches together with web content, which is similar to online applications but designed by Samsung, to be used online and offline.The S note seems perfect for students  who can stream a lecture live on the device at the same time as making notes on S Note. With many other note type systems/apps out there (the biggest that springs to mind being Evernote) one has to wonder if S Note has come to late to the party. That said, S Note´s advantage is that it is already installed on the tablet.

What remains to be seen is how well the new Galaxy tablet fits into the tablet marketplace. Google´s Nexus 7 is selling well and there is also much anticipation about newer ipad models. How will the Galaxy Note 10.1 be pitched in terms of price and will it offer that extra something? Usability, speed and reliability are all often associated with Samsung´s mobile tech so we will all be keen to see how the new 10.1 tablet fairs.

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The Overall Impact of Everyone in the UK Having 3 Phones

The Overall Impact of Everyone in the UK Having 3 Phones – Think About Phone Recycling

How many individuals do you believe have mobile phones in the UK?

In December 2008 it was estimated that around 76 million people used mobile phones in the UK alone. This number will have increased a lot over the years with many people across the UK and world-wide using mobiles more often; you can begin to picture how essential gadget reuse is. In the UK every 12 to 18 months, new mobile phones are made by the phone companies whether the old models still work or not. The old mobile phones are thrown away where they will end up decaying in rubbish sites around England. Recent studies suggest that it could take a few centuries for a mobile phone to decay completely.

Approximately 150 million mobile phones are used in the UK, all together comes up to an estimated bodyweight of 22 600 tonnes. The majority of people will not have a second thought about throwing away an old mobile phone, however, when they are thrown in the bin more space has to be found to store all the waste around the globe. Mobile phones tend to leak substances from the power supplies stored within; these are leaked into the atmosphere and can end up damaging our ground and even water supplies. One mobile alone could contaminate as much as 6 000 litres of water. In the UK, it is stated that it is now an offence to throw old mobile phones and other electronics into the bin.

Mobile phones should be taken to neighbourhood recycling focuses, given to foundations or reused. Instead of doing this, we instead pollute the globe by throwing them away. By recycling mobile phones, you would not just be sparing the atmosphere but you could earn money. Knowing that you could contribute to greener living but also earn money is an excellent motivator. Recycling technology can mean that it is being utilised over and over in advancing nations so that we reduce the number of mobiles filling up landfill sites.

Countless recycling companies now ask users to not just discard old mobile phones but in addition; gaming consoles, MP3 and photo/video cameras. More extensive electronic devices (i.e. TV’s and other home gadgets) might also be brought to reusing sites for sale transfers. These sites are effortless to utilise and a considerable number of them will pay customers for sending their old mobiles to be recycled. This is an excellent way to make extra money and discard unused mobile phones. These handsets are then reused to make newer models or sent to advancing nations where mobile phones are not yet available to the vast majority of the country’s population.

There is a growing consciousness on recycling old mobile phones in the UK. This was after recycling targets were set by the EU and in addition due to the measure of a variety of adverts informing people about how critical it is to discard old mobiles effectively.

With recycling plans now ready both within the web based world and outside the web, once people comprehend what to do there is no explanation as to why they should not recycle. People ought to be recycling their old handsets effectively. By recycling mobiles we are additionally avoiding a build up of carbon dioxide being emitted into the environment. Taking this more ecological approach definitely helps us all.

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